Scottish History
Home ] [ Scottish History ] Robert the Bruce ] Scottish Towns ] Scottish Golf Courses ] Jacobite Rebellion ] Sir Edwin Landseer ] Scottish Uniforms ] Scottish Regiments ] Trains & Steamers ] Highland Pipers ] Highland Scenes ] Clyde Steamers ] Gift Items ]

 

Historical Art Prints of famous Scottish historical figures William Wallace and Mary Queen of Scots, by Cranston Fine Arts

William Wallace ] Helen MacGregor ] Mary Queen of Scots ]

The Last Stand,  After the massacre of Glencoe, Some of the MacDonalds escape and from the hills keep watch for the Campbell's.





Item Code : - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING






Item Code : - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING






Item Code : - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING






Item Code : - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING


 
The Fall of Strome Castle by Alan Herriot  Situated on this rocky promontory, Strome Castle once bore witness to Royal bias, bitter clan rivalry, before being blown up in 1602.

Although archaeological excavations have revealed the possibility of a prehistoric site occupying the promontory prior to the building of the castle, the first formal record dates from 1742, only a few years after the castle was built. It was at this time that the castle and its associated lands, originally part of the earldom of Ross, were given to Allen Cameron of Lochiel. Despite confirmation of the event by a Glengarry. This paved the way for the bitter clan rivalry that was to follow.

In addition to political quarrelling, the castle was also a focal point of clan rivalry due to its strategic location, between the MacDonald territory of Lochcarron and Lochalsh and the rival MacKenzie land of Kintail. The years 1593- 1602 saw a continual struggle for control of the site, which ultimately came to a head when the castle was destroyed in 1602. The castle was under siege by the MacKenzies once again. They were about to admit defeat when they had a stroke of luck. According to a contemporary chronicler, some 'silly women' from the MacDonald clan left the castle to draw water from the well, 'they were so fearful and the light so bad' they accidentally poured the water into the gunpowder vat instead of the water container. When the MacDonald men discovered this disaster, they 'cursed the women loudly' but their curses backfired. A MacKenzie prisoner in the castle heard the commotion and, managed to escape to his own camp, he spread the news, which prompted a final attack from the clan chief MacKenzie of Kintail. The defenders had to admit defeat, as their cause was now hopeless. The MacDonald's surrendered on the condition that their lives and baggage were spared. Once the clan had left the castle, MacKenzie blew it up, and it has remained in ruins ever since.