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Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
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THIS ITEM IS INCLUDED IN OUR BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE OFFER !
Choose any two prints in this special offer and the lower priced item is half price. (Any free bonus prints already supplied with an item are separate and will also be included !)
Hundreds of items across our websites are included in this offer!

The Last of the Clan by Faed.


The Last of the Clan by Faed.

Item Code : SC0027The Last of the Clan by Faed. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
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PRINT Open edition print. Image size 18 inches x 14 inches (46cm x 36cm)none32.00

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Extra Details : The Last of the Clan by Faed.
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This Week's Half Price Art

MT26. Juan for Williams by Michael Thompson.
Juan for Williams by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 30.00
 In one of the most astounding and unlikely comebacks in Champion's League history, Liverpool came back from a half time deficit of 3 goals against AC Milan to take the final to extra time, and subsequently won the penalty shoot-out.  Here, Steven Gerrard sends his team on the road to recovery by heading in Liverpool's first goal early in the second half.

Liverpool Euro Final by Robert Highton. (B)
Half Price! - 50.00
 Monte Carlo - June 1st 2003 and Juan Pablo Montoya put in an outstanding drive, pushing his Williams BMW to victory in the Monaco Grand Prix.  His triumph in what is possibly the most prestigious race of the season allowed him to celebrate his first win since Italy in 2001.

Harbour Master by Gerald Coulson.
Half Price! - 90.00
DH007. Steady Johnnie Steady by Erskine Nicol.
Steady Johnnie Steady by Erskine Nicol.
Half Price! - 12.00

 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
In the final moments of extra time of the game, the England number 10, Jonny Wilkinson slotted a perfect drop goal which clinched victory over Australia, winning 20 points to 17.

Rugby World Cup Final 2003 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
GIFP3446GL. The Drive.  Conway Links  by Douglas Adams (1853 to 1920) (GL)
The Drive. Conway Links by Douglas Adams (1853 to 1920) (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Valentino Rossi.  Honda RC211V
Master on Two Wheels by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 28.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

DHM940GS.  Napoleon at the Battle of Borodino by Robert Hillingford.
Napoleon at the Battle of Borodino by Robert Hillingford (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
GIDT7716GS.  Bonaparte and the Survivors of the Forlorn Hope at St Jean by Richard Caton Woodville.
Bonaparte and the Survivors of the Forlorn Hope at St Jean by Richard Caton Woodville. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
 With the full might of Englands Army now gathered to do battle before the besieged Stirling Castle, the young Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory over the enemy. To the west of the Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God. The Scottish battle lines are prepared. The Cavalry is in reserve to the rear behind the spearmen and archers (known as Flower of the forest) in tightly packed Schiltrons patiently awaiting the coming onslaught. Unknown to the English, the open marshy ground of no mans land conceals hidden pits and trenches, major obstacles for any mounted charge.  Despite Cliffords and de Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle the day before, years of victory have taught the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the bowmen to effectively weaken the enemy lines the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable forest of spears and into defeat and death.  With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through the mass of spears but the Scots stand firm. The momentum of the charge is lost and there is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground, casualties amongst the English are horrific. Robert Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The Englishmen are slowly pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn. All discipline is lost as the soldiers and horses madly scramble for the far bank of the burn. Many drown or perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, with his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of Stirling Castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland victory is complete.  Text by Paul Scarron-Jones.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 70.00
 When 250 well armed and trained rebel tribesmen attacked the small SAS outpost at Mirbat few would have given good odds on their survival.  At the height of the battle Corporal Labalaba and Trooper Savesaki, both Fijians and both wounded fought off relentless assaults by the attacking Adoo.  Firing a World War II vintage 25pdr field gun at point blank range Labalaba finally fell to a snipers bullet just as Captain Kealy and Trooper Tobin reached the gunpit to aid its defence.  Within minutes however Tobin was dead, but Kealy and the remaining defenders critical position was saved by the timely arrival of 2 Omani Strikemaster jets, and helicopters carrying 24 men of G Squadron.

Sacrifice at Mirbat, Dhofar, Oman, 19th July 1972 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 80.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 The vulnerability of early air gunners is evident in this painting as this Royal Aircraft Establishment FE 2 comes under attack from a Fokker E.III early in World War 1. Archaic in appearance, compared to their German rivals, the FE2 was nevertheless heavily armed with three Lewis guns arranged to cover almost every angle, one of them fixed in a forward firing position for the pilot to operate.

Tribute to the Air Gunners - Royal Aircraft Establishment FE2 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Stukas from StG 2 Immelmann, part of the mixed unit Schlachtgeschwader, attack soviet T-34 tanks in an attempt to blunt the soviet 1943 offensives.  Throughout 1943-45, squadrons operating the Ju87G variants equipped with 37mm cannons became effective tank-killers, although in increasingly small numbers.  Despite the success of Stuka tank killers, the losses inflicted on soviet armour were unable to prevent the soviet advance.

Stukas of SG2 by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - 400.00
A large umbrella of Spitfire Wings covered most of the sky over Dieppe during the Allied attack Operation Jubilee on 19th August 1942. Squadron leader Johnnie Johnson leads 610 (County of Chester) Squadron down from top cover support to lend a hand to Spitfires of 485 Squadron (New Zealand) and 411 Squadron (Canadian) which made up the 12 Group Wing, led by W/C Pat Jameson. The enemy being made up of a huge mixed force of Fw190 and Me109 fighters from JG2 and JG26. 12 Group Wing flew four times that disastrous day and in the end the Royal Air Force lost 106 aircraft compared to the Luftwaffe losses of 48.

The Battle for the Skies Over Dieppe, 19th August 1942 by Graeme Lothian (P)
Half Price! - 2000.00
 Tribute to the ground crew of Bomber Command. Ground crew inspect and prepare the engines of a Stirling bomber as it is refuelled in preparation for that nights mission.

Stirling Work by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00

 

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