Order Enquiries (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Product Search         

Portrait d un Enfent, 1882 by Henri De Toulouse-Lautrec. (GS) - scottishartprints.com

Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 6 hours, 43 minutes!

Portrait d un Enfent, 1882 by Henri De Toulouse-Lautrec. (GS)


Portrait d un Enfent, 1882 by Henri De Toulouse-Lautrec. (GS)

Item Code : GISD4683GSPortrait d un Enfent, 1882 by Henri De Toulouse-Lautrec. (GS) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £250.00

Quantity:
HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE ... HALF PRICE SALE
THIS GICLEE CANVAS IS HALF PRICE!
For a short time, this item is being offered at half of its normal price.
We have many thousands of items like this across our website, offering great value to our customers.
Items included in the offer are changed frequently.
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


This Week's Half Price Art

 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
GITW5600GS.  Safely Over by Thomas Blinks.

Safely Over by Thomas Blinks (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Michael Schumacher hurtles round the famous Eau Rouge corner at the Spa-Francorchamps circuit at the Belgian Grand Prix.  Schumacher won this event in his Ferrari in 1996, 1997, 2001 and 2002, completing a total of 6 wins at one of the legendary Formula One circuits.

Schumacher at Spa by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 TWR Jaguar XJR 9LM - Winner of the 1988 Le Mans.  The car in this image is shown at maximum speed on the Mulsanne Straight (240mph)  Drivers: Jan Lammers, Johnny Dumfries and Andy Wallace.  This was the first win for Jaguar since 1957.  Previous victories at Le Mans were in 1951 and 1953 with C types and in 1955, 1956 and 1957 with D types.  Jaguar also won Le Mans in 1990 with the XJR 12LM.
Top Cat by Graham Bosworth.
Half Price! - £24.00

 Elf Tyrrell Ford 006.  World Champion 1973.
Jackie Stewart by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Damon Hill in the number 7 Jordan leads the Ferrari of Michael Schumacher early in the 1999 Formula One season.

Damon Hill - Jordan by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 The Meteor, vintage racing schooner.
A Soldiers Wind by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Marlboro McLaren Mercedes MP4/11. 1996.
David Coulthard by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art



The Charge of the Scots Greys at Waterloo - Sgt Ewart Captures the French Eagle by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 While other Tigers of his command struck northwest and decimated the tanks and half tracks of the Sharpshooters and Rifle Brigade parked along the road towards point 213 and Caen, Haupsturmfuhrer Michel Wittmann attacked on his own to the south east.  Driving his panzer into the village of Villers Bocage. he proceeded to destroy the Stuart and Cromwell tanks of Viscount Arthur Cranleys 4th County of London Yeomanry the Sharpshooters RHQ.  Although subsequently immobilized in the village center, the battle between the British 7th Armoured Division Desert Rats and Wittmanns 101st Heavy Tank Battalion continued for a full day, and blunted the British threat to the German line.

Wittmann at Villers Bocage, Normandy, 0900 hrs, June 13th 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Depicting Polish Lancers escorting a generals carriage as they pass through an infantry bivouac during the Hundred Days Campaign.

The Generals Escort by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00
As the evening draws to a close Napoleon is seen riding amongst his men after their victory at the Battle of Friedland.  Due to the French pressure the Russian Commander General Levin Bennigsen moved his army back to his main camp at Konigsberg in June 1807, while his army of 60,000 men crossed the River Alle at Friedland.  It was faced by a French force of 26,000 under the command of Marshal Jean Lannes. The Russian Commander attacked early on the 14th of June. The much smaller force fought of the Russian attacks for nine hours, giving time for the main French force of 80,000 to arrive. Marshall Neys Force came up from the south and attacked the Russian left flank which gave way all the way along the river until just outside Friedland where it was halted. A second corps under the command of General Laude Victor came to the support of Neys left flank. Victor also brought up 30 Artillery pieces which blasted the Russians at very short range. The Russians that were massed in the tiny village and unable to cross the River received huge numbers of casualties due to the artillery fire. General Bennigsens army was decimated with most of his troops killed, wounded or forced to cross the river.  The actual looses were 11,000 dead, 7,000 wounded and many thousands of troops drowned trying to cross the river. This compared to the French losses of 1372 killed 9,108 wounded.   The French army pursued the Russians with Marshal Soult occupying Konigsberg on June 16th.  A few days later Czar Alexander I arranged a truce and on the 25th of June on a barge like raft on the River Niemen along with the Prussian King Frederick Willaim III drew up the Treaty of Tilset. Prussia ceded to France all the territories West of the Elbe, becoming the Kingdom of Westphalia and from the area of Poland both Russia and Prussia recognised the new state, The Duchy of Warsaw.

Battle of Friedland by Horace Vernet.
Half Price! - £40.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 Von Richthofens Fokker DR 1 Triplane (Serial No 425/17) in company with his wingman in a Fokker D.VII over the fields of the Western Front early in April 1918, peeling off to attack a flight of three British fighters.
In For The Kill by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
Outward bound, Stirling III of 199 Squadron based at Lakenheath, Suffolk, heads out on another night of operations in August 1943.  EE953, Sqd letters EX - E of 100 group is piloted by F/L Tom Austin DFC who finished his tour by the end of October 1944, winning the DFC with his bomb aimer F/O Jack Lawrence.  Nicknamed the Queen of the Skies, the Stirling was the 1st four engined bomber to enter service with the RAF in 1941.  The cockpit stood a massive 22.5 feet from the ground and had an operational ceiling of only 12,000 feet, well within the range of the enemy AA guns.  By September 1944 other bombers were taking the brunt of the attack to the Germans and the Stirlings were used mainly for glider towing especially for D-day and Arnhem.

Tribute to the Crews of the Stirling by Graeme Lothian (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 The highest scoring Sopwith Camel ace of World War 1, Donald MacLaren was born in Ottawa, Canada, in 1893. Joining the Royal Flying Corps in 1917 as a trainee pilot, it was only the following March that he claimed his first victory, a Hannover C-Type whilst posted to 46 Squadron. His kill rate was quite formidable for, in this the final year of the war, he was to claim no fewer than 54 confirmed victories. Indeed, in the period from 15th September to 2nd October, he claimed eight Fokker D.VIIs - a remarkable feat against Germanys most potent fighter. He is pictured here attacking a D.VII in Camel F2137 U of 46 Sqn. MacLaren survived the war and died in 1989.

Donald MacLaren by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Three Gloster Meteor F.Mk4s of 222 'Natal' Squadron are depicted on a training sortie over the Forth Bridge in the early 1950s.

222 Sqn Meteors over the Forth Bridge by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00

Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page