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Scotland Forever by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)


Scotland Forever by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)

Probably the best known painting of the gallant charge of the Royal North Dragoons, The Scots Greys at the Battle of Waterloo. According to an eyewitness Alexander Armour at the start of the charge of the greys had to pass through the ranks of the Highland Brigade and armour recalled The highlanders were then ordered to wheel back, when they did so we rushed through them at the same time they heard us calling Now my boys Scotland Forever.
Item Code : DHM0200YScotland Forever by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y) - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (2 prints reduced to clear).

Ex display prints with some slight surface scratches.
Image size 32in x 15in (81cm x 38cm) noneHalf
Price!
Now : 31.00

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Other editions of this item : Scotland Forever by Lady Elizabeth Butler.DHM0200
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 32in x 15in (81cm x 38cm) noneHalf
Price!

Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
Now : 38.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 14 inches x 7 inches (36cm x 18cm)none5 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 20.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Small number of giclee canvas prints available. Size 40 inches x 26 inches (102cm x 66cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : 300.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Small number of giclee canvas prints available. Size 36 inches x 22 inches (91cm x 56cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : 250.00VIEW EDITION...
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Black and white photogravure, published 1894 by S Hildesheimer. Size 14 inches x 26 inches (36cm x 66cm)none700.00VIEW EDITION...

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 Dawn.  British artillery thundered, and the territorial soldiers 15th Scottish division stormed towards the  German trenches defending the  coal mining village of Loos.  The gas cloud that preceded the Highland advance was pendulous and largely stationary due to a distinct lack of wind, and ,upon emerging from the smudgy gas, the highlanders were pelted with  machine gun fire and shrapnel from the defending German batteries.  Not to be denied, the Scots gritted their teeth, and with an officer shouting faster boys! give them hell! the highlanders charged straight at the defenses. The Germans, unnerved by the stubborn courage of their kilted opponents, began to fall back through the village of Loos.  The Camerons and the Black Watch, shouting their battle cry and charging down the main road of the village, then engaged the defending Germans in a series of savage battles for each and every house - hob-nailed boots, rifle butts, and bayonets being wielded with great enthusiasm by the vengeful Scots.  By 8.00am the village was in Scottish hands.

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This Week's Half Price Sport Art

In the final moments of extra time of the game, the England number 10, Jonny Wilkinson slotted a perfect drop goal which clinched victory over Australia, winning 20 points to 17.

Rugby World Cup Final 2003 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Damon Hill, World Champion

King of the Track by Stuart Coffield
Half Price! - 20.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

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Half Price! - 75.00
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This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

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Half Price! - 50.00
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Half Price! - 35.00
  Grid Caldwell, the top New Zealand Ace with 25 victories in his SE5A of 74 Squadron, is shown taking off from his home airfield during the Great War. Keith Logan (Grid Caldwell) was born 16th October 1895.  At the outbreak of World War One, Caldwell joined the territorial army.  He attempted to enlist with the New Zealand expeditionary force destined for Gallipoli but was refused.  In October 1915 he paid the sum of £100 to join the first class of the New Zealand Flying School.  In January 1916 Grid Caldwell arrived in England and was commissioned into the Royal Flying Corps in April that year.  In July 1916 he was posted to No.8 Squadron, flying BE2Cs and Ds on observation duty.  It was on 18th September 1916 his first aerial victory was scored, shooting down a Roland CII.  He transferred to 60 Squadron in November and flew Nieuport 17 fighters and was promoted to Captain in February 1917.  During this period he scored further victories, shooting down Albatros Scouts, and on 17th September was awarded the Military Cross.  In October 1917 he was posted back to England as an instructor.  In March 1918, promoted to Major, he was given command of 74 Squadron RAF flying SE5As.  The squadron under his command was credited with 140 aircraft destroyed and 85 out of control.  This tally was scored in the last eight months of the war with the loss of only 15 pilots killed or taken prisoner.  During his wartime flying, he had fought dogfights with German aces Werner Voss and Herman Becker, and he once survived a mid-air collision, bringing his badly damaged aircraft to ground level, jumping out before it crashed.  He was credited with 11 aircraft destroyed, 3 shared destroyed or captured and 10 out of control, and 1 further shared out of control.  During World War Two he was station commander at Woodbourne and later Wigram and posted to India in 1944.  After the war he was made commander of the British Empire.  He retired from the RNZAF in 1956, and sadly died of cancer in Auckland on 28th November 1980.

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Half Price! - 300.00

 

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