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Helen MacGregor in the Conflict at the Pass of Loch Ard by Siegfried Detler Bendixon (B) - scottishartprints.com

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Helen MacGregor in the Conflict at the Pass of Loch Ard by Siegfried Detler Bendixon (B)


Helen MacGregor in the Conflict at the Pass of Loch Ard by Siegfried Detler Bendixon (B)

Item Code : DHM0644BHelen MacGregor in the Conflict at the Pass of Loch Ard by Siegfried Detler Bendixon (B) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print. Image size 12 inches x 9 inches (31cm x 23cm)none£14.00

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Other editions of this item : Helen MacGregor in the Conflict at the Pass of Loch Ard by Siegfried Detler Bendixon.DHM0644
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print. Image size 24 inches x 17 inches (61cm x 43cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £30.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 40 inches x 30 inches (102cm x 76cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £300.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 200 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 22 inches (76cm x 56cm)noneHalf
Price!
Now : £200.00VIEW EDITION...

This Week's Half Price Art

 The Battle of Aliwal was fought on 28th January 1846 between the British and the Sikhs.  The British were led by Sir Harry Smith, while the Sikhs were led by Ranjodh Singh Majithia.  The British won a victory which is sometimes regarded as the turning point of the First Anglo-Sikh War.  The Sikhs had occupied a position 4 miles (6.4 km) long, which ran along a ridge between the villages of Aliwal, on the Sutlej, and Bhundri.  The Sutlej ran close to their rear for the entire length of their line, making it difficult for them to manoeuvre and also potentially disastrous if they were forced to retreat.  After the initial artillery salvoes, Smith determined that Aliwal was the Sikh weak point.  He sent two of his four infantry brigades to capture the village, from where they could enfilade the Sikh centre.  They seized the village, and began pressing forwards to threaten the fords across the Sutlej.  As the Sikhs tried to swing back their left, pivoting on Bhundri, some of their cavalry tried to threaten the open British left flank.  A British and Indian cavalry brigade, led by the 16th Lancers, charged and dispersed them.  The 16th Lancers then attacked a large body of Sikh infantry.  These were battalions organised and trained in contemporary European fashion by Neapolitan mercenary, Paolo Di Avitabile.  They formed square to receive cavalry, as most European armies did.  Nevertheless, the 16th Lancers broke them, with heavy casualties.  The infantry in the Sikh centre tried to defend a nullah (dry stream bed), but were enfiladed and forced into the open by a Bengal infantry regiment, and then cut down by fire from Smith's batteries of Bengal Horse Artillery.  Unlike most of the battles of both Anglo-Sikh Wars, when the Sikhs at Aliwal began to retreat, the retreat quickly turned into a disorderly rout across the fords.  Most of the Sikh guns were abandoned, either on the river bank or in the fords, along with all baggage, tents and supplies.  They lost 2,000 men and 67 guns. <i><br><br>Comment from the artist, Jason Askew.</i><br><br>This painting shows the extremely violent and brutal clash between British cavalry (16th Lancers) and Sikh infantry at the battle of Aliwal.  The Sikh infantry formed 2 triangles, a version of the famous Allied/British squares used at Waterloo, but the Sikhs, after firing a ragged volley at the attacking horsemen, dropped their muskets and assaulted the cavalry with their traditional Tulwars (sabres) and dhal shields.  These shields are also used offensively, to punch, and to slice with the edge.  Although the British horsemen claimed a victory as they felt they successfully dispersed the Sikh triangles, and forced the Sikh infantry to retreat to the nullah (dry stream bed) in the Sikh rear, this opinion is open to debate.  The Sikhs traditionally fought in loose formations, with tulwar and shield-taking full advantage of their abilities as swordsmen, blades being weapons with which the Sikhs are particularly skilled in the use of.  The Sikhs actually inflicted more casualties on the 16th Lancers than the lancers inflicted on the Sikh infantry.  British eye witnesses spoke of the sight of the grotesquely swollen and distorted dead bodies of men and horses of the Her Majesty's 16th Lancers, stinking in the sun and littering the ground at Aliwal - testimony to the progress of their charge.  The regiment lost 27% of effectives out of a total strength of over 400 effectives.  The lancers were dreadfully hacked about, many being cruelly maimed for life, losing hands and limbs to the slashing strokes of the Sikh blades.  The Sikhs had no compassion for the cavalry horses either - many of the poor animals (over 100 by some accounts) had to be shot, due to having their legs hacked clean off, or being literally disemboweled by Sikh Tulwars.  In the painting, the central figure with the wizard-shaped Turban, is in fact an Akali - a sect of extremely religious Sikhs, who disdained the use of armour, and often fought to the death with a fanatical and suicidal devotion.

The Battle of Aliwal by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 This incident took place on October 23rd,1914. A party of German soldiers had been driven to take shelter in the small house. British artillery then targeted the house, making the situation of the Germans uncomfortable.  Under cover of the bombardment, a company of Cameron Highlanders rushed the position, intercepting  the Germans as they tried to extricate themselves.  After a brief struggle, and being somewhat unnerved by the prompt appearance of the Highlanders; the German group surrendered.

Cameron Highlanders Capture a German Force on the Yser by Jason Askew. (GM)
Half Price! - £300.00
DHM6058P. A United States Cavalry rider is caught in single combat with a Native American Indian horseman.

Scene from the Indian Wars by Alan Herriot. (P)
Half Price! - £1100.00
 Jagdpanthers of 654 heavy Tank Battalion engage 6th Guards Tank Brigade Churchills.
Debut at Caumont, Normandy, 30th July 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £80.00

Union soldiers engaging the advancing Confederate forces.
The Skirmish Line by Gilbert Gaul.
Half Price! - £33.00
 During the morning of June 7th the 82nd Airborne were attacked by a mixed German battle group. Supported by 4th Division armour the Paratroopers and Glider troops repelled the attack which lasted most of the day.

Fighting for a Foothold, 82nd Airborne, St Mere Eglise, 1944 by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
Bhurtpore, about a hundred miles South of Delhi, was a fortified city perched on a great mound. The walls of the fortress were built of mud, of immense thickness, and the round shot fired by artillery in those days simply buried themselves deeply in their sides. Following the murder of the rightful successor to the ruler of Bhurtpore, lawlessness and oppression prevailed in the region. The Governor General ordered the Bengal Army to restore order there.  One cavalry and two infantry divisions, with a powerful siege train of the Bengal Army marched towards the city. Then began the slow, methodical work of digging the parallels, emplacing the guns behind defensive parapets and bringing up and defending the massive quantity of ammunition that was required. In the rocky soil around Bhurtpore every European and Native soldier was employed in the hard work of digging these positions. The guns steadily pushed forward as new parallels were dug, until the breaching batteries were established no more than 250 yards from the fortress. On 18th January 1826 the final assault was made, and Bhurtpore was captured.  Gabions filled with earth protect the guns from enemy fire. Above these are laid fascines and sandbags. Bhurtpore's crumbling walls of dry mud, which the artillery has been bombarding night and day, can be glimpsed above the gun position. I have depicted an iron 24-pounder gun on its wooden platform. The piece of the gun would have been horizontal at this range. The NCO in charge of the gun is sighting it by looking along the piece. Two men with hand-spikes manhandle the bracket trail according to his instructions. This would have to be done each time the gun was fired. The solid round shot has been loaded and rammed home on its wooden sabot. After correctly laying the gun, the NCO will retire to the left rear and order the man holding the portfire to ignite the charge. A native lascar or Golundauze is replenishing the water bucket for the spongeman. In the background a bugler of the Bengal Artillery can be glimpsed in his red jacket. At far right is a soldier of HM's 59th Foot, which served in the trenches and took part in the assault.  In 1861 the Bengal Artillery was absorbed into the Royal Artillery.
3rd Company, 4th Battalion Bengal Artillery at the Siege of Bhurtpore, 1825-26. Now 57 (Bhurtpore) Locating Battery Royal Artillery (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
DR40GS.  Operation Grapple 1, Bosnia 29 October 1992 - 11 May 1993 by David Rowlands.

Operation Grapple 1, Bosnia 29 October 1992 - 11 May 1993 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

GIDT8450GS.  Sweetsauce with J Charlton Up. 1860 by Henry Barraud (1811-1874)
Sweetsauce with J Charlton Up. 1860 by Henry Barraud (1811-1874) (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00
 Adelaide, Australia, the final race of the 1993 Formula 1 season.  Ayrton Senna was tragically killed at Imola, Italy, in May the following year.

Senna's Final Victory by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £250.00
MC0042P. Tomahawk by Mark Churms.

Tomahawk by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £1200.00
GIAA2550GS.  The Forest Stakes by Henry Alken.
The Forest Stakes by Henry Alken. (GS)
Half Price! - £200.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 On the 20th of April 1918, just one day before his death, the legendary Red Baron, Mannfred von Richthofen, claimed his final victory.  His famous Flying Circus was engaged in battle by Sopwith Camels of No.3 and No.201 Squadron.  Claiming his 79th victory, he had shot down Major Richard Raymond-Barker earlier in the dogfight - the British pilot being killed in the resulting crash.  However, it is his 80th and final victory that is depicted here.  In the centre of the painting, the Sopwith Camel of David Lewis has been brought into the firing line of von Richthofen, and is about to be sent down in flames from the sky - Lewis was fortunate to survive the encounter relatively unscathed.  Meanwhile the chaos of the dogfight is all around this duel, with aircraft of both sides wheeling and diving in combat.  The other pilots depicted are Weiss, Bell, Riley, Steinhauser, Mohnicke, Hamilton and Wenzl.

The Final Curtain by Ivan Berryman. (GM)
Half Price! - £350.00
 10th May 1972. Lt. Curt Dose together with his RIO, LCDR Jim McDevitt line up their F-4J Phantom prior to landing on the USS Constellation following their first successful target CAP of the day. During this mission they claimed a MiG-21F after a ultra-low level supersonic flight over the North Vietnamese airfield of Kep, northeast of Hanoi.
Silver Kite 211 by Philip West. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
 Whilst on a strafing sortie over German occupied St Trond airfield on 25th February 1944, Spitfires of 331 Sqn launched an attack on the Heinkel He.177 bombers that were stationed there.  Among those taking part was Norwegian ace Lieutenant Frederick Arild Sverdrup Fearnley, flying Spitfire Mk IX MJ354 (FN-W).  Fearnley shared in the destruction of a Heinkel He.177 as it tried to take off, but his Spitfire was immediately hit by ground fire, the young Norwegian losing his life in the ensuing crash.  Fearnley was credited with a possible 7 victories in his short career.

Mayhem at St Trond by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
DHM623GL. 4th Regiment Army Air Corps, Helicopter Landing Site in Iraq, Operation Dessert Storm, 26th February 1991 by David Rowlands.

4th Regiment Army Air Corps, Helicopter Landing Site in Iraq, Operation Dessert Storm, 26th February 1991 by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

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